Megan’s Law could keep you from moving to or from New Jersey

On behalf of Maynard Law Office, LLC posted in Megan’s Law on Thursday, May 7, 2015.

Registered sex offenders face a number of regulations that can severely limit their community participation. Since the inception of Megan’s Law, which mandates that convicted sex offenders register in state and Internet registries, the complications have only increased.

It is true that everyone has to pay for their alleged crimes, but registries can create extreme obstacles, making it difficult for those convicted to become productive members of society. For example, property owners who access the registry might choose not to rent to convicted sex offenders. Another example is the difficulty those convicted face in finding gainful employment.

Such extreme monitoring and crime prevention measures are necessary in some instances, but the results are intrusive and often self-defeating to someone trying to overcome his or her past. It is difficult to leave behind one’s mistakes and take a proactive approach to living as a law-abiding citizen when the very laws a person wants to live by makes it seem impossible.

Many convicted sex offenders think the answer to their problems is moving to another location, far away from the backlash of their conviction. This certainly sounds like a great idea, but it is far easier said than done.

Why is it so hard? Because sex offenders in New Jersey and elsewhere will likely remain monitored for a very long time, even for life in some circumstances. This means moving out of the area can be a time-consuming and difficult process, especially without outside assistance. Successfully acquiring an out of state parole transfer typically means getting help from an attorney in your area.

If you would like further details about how to move while on parole, please visit our Megan’s Law or out of state web pages.

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